Sep 7, 2014

Crocodile Bread - Pane Coccodrillo

       English / Italiano

At first I thought the name Crocodile Bread was due to the stream of tears I had shed (or was it just cold sweat?) during the "making of", or maybe due to the irrepressible impulse to "bite" while the nervous breakdown was approaching… But no, his creator, Gianfranco Anelli, a baker in Rome, named it for its shape. For its shape??! Well, you need a lot of phantasy to see a crocodile in my loaves, don’t you? I really don’t get it, but I think he meant the shape of the crumb (the perfect crocodile loaves have much more holes in their crumb and a slice may look like the mouth of a crocodile). Furthermore, it is believed that the pane Coccodrillo (Crocodile Bread in Italian) was his most popular bread as well. 

It will take you two to three days to make the bread, but the working time on the first two days is only 5 to 10 minutes: 
On day 1 you prepare the first starter; on day 2 the second starter and on day 3 you knead the dough, shape and bake the loaves (I wish I were a fly to see you kneading! Am I being too sadistic?).

The original recipe is from the book "The Italian Baker, Revised: The Classic Tastes of the Italian Countryside” by Carol Field and was baked by the Bread Baking Babes in March 2008. The Kitchen of the Month was Lien of “Notitie van Lien”.

When the two loaves were happily having their oven spring, at that precise moment only, I started to relax and a smile appeared: "It worked! It worked!". An accurate search in the web confirmed that this bread was really a "naughty one". Please do visit the blog of Elizabeth: a text full of feelings about this difficult but tasty bread, which reminds me of the delicious "Ciabatta bread". 

In un primo momento ho pensato che il nome Coccodrillo fosse dovuto ai fiumi di lacrime che avevo versato (o forse stavo solo sudando freddo!) o che fosse dovuto all’irrefrenabile impulso di mordere mentre ero sull’orlo di una crisi di nervi mentre preparavo il pane. Ma no, il suo ideatore, il panettiere Gianfranco Anelli di Roma, lo ha battezzato così per la sua forma. Per la sua forma??! Beh, ci vuole un sacco di fantasia per riuscire a vedere un coccodrillo nelle mie pagnotte!
L’unica spiegazione che riesco a darmi è che parlasse della forma della fetta di pane: i Coccodrilli perfetti hanno un’alveolatura maggiore e guardando la mollica si potrebbe pensare alla bocca di un coccodrillo. Inoltre, si dice che il pane Coccodrillo fosse il suo pane più popolare.  

Per preparare questo pane ci vogliono due o tre giorni, ma il tempo di lavorazione necessario nei primi due giorni è di soli 5 ​​- 10 minuti:
Il primo giorno si prepara la prima biga; il secondo giorno si prepara la seconda biga; il terzo giorno si impasta e si cuoce… ps: vorrei essere una mosca per spiarvi mentre impastate! Uuuh come sono sadica!).

La ricetta originale tratta dal libro "The Italian Baker, Revised: The Classic Tastes of the Italian Countryside” by Carol Field” di Carol Field  è stata preparata dalle Bread Baking Babes nel mese di settembre 2010 e scelta da Lien di “Notitie vanLien”

Quando le mie due pagnotte stavano felicemente lievitando nel forno (solo in quel preciso momento e non un attimo prima!) mi sono rilassata e ho sorriso: "Ce l’ho fatta! Ce l’ho fatta!”.

Poi, una veloce ricerca nel web ha confermato che questo pane è davvero "tosto" da preparare. Se leggete l’inglese, vi consiglio di visitare il blog di Elizabeth: vi attende una piacevole lettura, un testo pieno di "sentimenti" dedicato al pane Coccodrillo. Pane che tra l'altro mi ricorda la delizosa Ciabatta. 


The 1st and 2nd Starter

First starter (please find my comments in red):
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast or 1/6 small cake (3 grams) fresh yeast
1 cup (240 ml) warm water
1/4 cup (35 grams) durum flour (1/4 cup of "my" durum flour weighted 50-55 grams. So I added 55 grams)
3/4 cup (90 grams) unbleached stone-ground flour* (*use strong bread flour -stone ground or not- for a better result) (3/4 cup of my bread flour / Germany 550, weighted 105 grams. So I used 105 grams)

Directions:
The morning of the first day, stir the yeast into the water; let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes. Add the flours and stir with a wooden spoon about 50 strokes or with the paddle of an electric mixer about 30 seconds (picture 1). Cover with plastic wrap and let rise 12 to 24 hours. The starter should be bubbly (picture 2: 19 hours later).

Second starter:
1 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast or 1/2 small cake (9 grams) fresh yeast
1/4 cup (60 ml) warm water
1 1/4 cups (300 ml) water, room temperature
1/2 cup (70 grams) durum flour (1/2 cup of "my" durum flour weighted 100 grams. So I used 100 grams)
1 1/2 cups (180 grams) unbleached stone-ground flour (use strong bread flour -stone ground or not- for a better result) (1 1/2 cups of my bread flour / Germany 550, weighted 210 g grams. So I used 210 grams)

Directions: 
The evening of the same day or the next morning, stir the yeast into the warm water; let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes. Add the water, flours and dissolved yeast to the first starter and stir, using a spatula or wooden spoon or the paddle of the electric mixer until smooth (picture 3). Cover with plastic wrap and let rise 12 to 24 hours (picture 4: 17 hours later).

The Dough, the Shape, the Baking

Dough
- 1/4 cup (35 grams) durum flour (1/4 cup of my durum flour weighted 50-55 grams. So I used 55 g)
- 1 to 1 1/4 cups (120 to 140 grams) unbleached stone-ground flour (use strong bread flour -stone ground or not- for a better result) (1 to 1 1/4 cups of my bread flour / Germany 550, weighted 140-175 grams. So I used 175 g)
- 1 1/2 teaspoons (10-15 grams) salt* (*it says 25 g in the book, but this will get you a very, very salty crocodile) (I've used 14 grams, BUT it still need a bit more. I'd say 16-18 grams)
- 6-7 Tablespoons bread flour (I've added them at the third turn as the dough was too runny
- more bread flour to sprinkle the working surface and the baking sheet 
- cornmeal for the baking stone

By mixer:
The next day, add the durum flour and 1 cup unbleached flour to the starter in a mixer bowl; mix with the paddle on the lowest speed for 17 minutes. Add the salt and mix 3 minutes longer, adding the remaining flour if needed for the dough to come together. You may need to turn the mixer off once or twice to keep it from overheating. (Since I didn’t know what it was meant with: “the dough comes together”, I've added only the rest of the unbleached flour. On the other hand I had already used more than the original recipes states in cups).

By hand (for the brave!! but I would not recommend it):
If you decide to make this dough by hand (good luck!) place the starter, durum flour, and 1 cup unbleached flour in a wide mouthed bowl. Stir with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon for 25 to 30 minutes; then add the salt and remaining flour if needed and stir 5 minutes longer. The dough is very wet and will not be kneaded.

First Rise:
Pour the dough into a wide mouthed large bowl placed on an open trivet on legs or on a wok ring so that air can circulate all around it (picture 1). Loosely drape a towel over the top and let rise at about 70° F (21°C), turning the dough over in the bowl every hour, until just about tripled, 4 or 5 hours.
(I made 5 turn in total. At the 3rd turn I was losing my hope to see the dough come together and gain strength. So I’ve added 6-7 tablespoons of bread flour as the dough was still like pancake batter). (picture 2: the dough after the 5th turn).

Shaping and Second Rise:
Pour the wet dough onto a generously floured surface. Have a mound of flour nearby to flour your hands, the top of the oozy dough, and the work surface itself. This will all work fine-appearances to the contrary-but be prepared for an unusually wet dough (It was extremely wet and sticky. I had to smash and fold the dough in the air and work in more flour ...and I did this until it was "strong enough"). 
Make a big round shape of it by just folding and tucking the edges under a bit (picture 3). Please don't try to shape it precisely; it's a hopeless task and quite unnecessary. Place the dough on well, floured parchment or brown paper placed on a baking sheet or peel. Cover with a dampened towel and let rise until very blistered and full of air bubbles, about 45 minutes*. 
30 minutes before baking, preheat the oven with a baking stone in it to 475°F/246 °C. 
(picture 4: *after 45 minutes even if the dough was not full of bubbles, I divided the dough in two with a scraper, gave each piece one or two loose twists and arranged the loaves on a surface sprinkled with cornmeal flour (picture 5)).

Baking:
Just before baking, cut the dough in half down the center with a dough scraper as a knife would tear the dough. Gently slide the 2 pieces apart and turn so that the cut surfaces face upward (as I said before, I loosely twisted them)
Sprinkle the stone with cornmeal (well I did it but I would not do it again: the cornmeal burned (picture 6), which is almost logical at 475°F/246°C. So, with a wooden spoon I pushed the carbonized cornmeal in the corners and since my loaves had been previously arranged on a surface sprinkled with cornmeal, their bottoms were "cornmealed" enough to prevent them from sticking to the baking stone) and slide the dough on it. If you do not have a baking stone, bake the bread directly on the baking sheet.
Bake for about 30 to 35 minutes (after 20 minutes I reduced the heat to 392°F/200°C).
Cool on a rack before slicing.


Recipe (with some minor adaptions) from: 
Ricetta tratta e leggermente modificata da:

"The Italian Baker" by Carol Field

Amazon.de
Amazon.it
Amazon.co.uk








La Prima e la Seconda Biga

Prima biga (i miei commenti in rosso)
1/2 cucchiaino di lievito di birra disidratato o 3 grammi lievito di birra fresco 
240 ml di acqua tiepida 
1/4 di tazza (35 grammi) di farina di semola di grano duro rimacinata (farina durum) (1/4 di tazza della mia farina di semola di grano duro rimacinata (farina durum) pesava 50-55 grammi. Ho utilizzato 55 grammi) 
3/4 di tazza (90 grammi) di farina per panificazione (3/4 di tazze della mia farina per panificazione (Germania nr. 550) pesava 105 grammi. Ho utilizzato 105 grammi).  

Procedimento:
La mattina del primo giorno, sciogliere il lievito nell'acqua e attendere circa 10 minuti per lasciarlo attivare. Poi aggiungere le farine e mescolare con un cucchiaio di legno (50 bei colpetti) o 30 secondi con un mixer elettrico (foto 1). Coprire con della pellicola trasparente e lasciare lievitare da 12 a 24 ore. La biga sarà piena di bollicine (foto 2: 19 ore più tardi)

Seconda Biga: 
1 1/4 cucchiaino di lievito di birra disidratato o 9 grammi lievito di birra fresco
60 ml di acqua tiepida
300 ml di acqua, a temperatura ambiente 
1/2 tazza (70 grammi), di farina di semola di grano duro rimacinata (farina durum) (1/2 di tazza della mia farina di semola di grano duro rimacinata (farina durum) pesava 100 grammi. Ho utilizzato 100 grammi)
1 1/2 tazze (180 grammi) di farina per panificazione  (1 1/2 tazze della mia farina per panificazione (Germania nr. 550) pesava 210 grammi. Ho utilizzato 210 grammi). 

Procedimento:
La sera dello stesso giorno o la mattina successiva, sciogliere il lievito nell'acqua e attendere circa 10 minuti per lasciarlo attivare. 
Aggiungere alla prima biga l'acqua a temperatura ambiente, le farine e il lievito attivato e mescolare con una spatola, un cucchiaio di legno oppure la frusta a foglia del vostro mixer finché non risulti un composto omogeneo (foto 3). Coprire con della pellicola trasparente e lasciare lievitare da 12 a 24 ore (Foto 4: 17 ore più tardi).

L'impasto, la Forma e la Cottura

L'impasto:
- 1/4 di tazza (35 grammi) di farina di semola di grano duro rimacinata (farina durum) (1/4 di tazza della mia farina di semola di grano duro rimacinata (farina durum) pesava 50-55 grammi. Ho utilizzato 55 grammi) 
- Da 1 a 1 1/4 tazze (120-140 grammi) di farina per panificazione (da 1 a 1 1/4 di tazza della mia farina per panificazione (Germania nr. 550) pesava 140 - 175 grammi. Ho utilizzato 175 grammi). 
- 1 1/2 cucchiaini (10-15 grammi) di sale (la ricetta originale richiede 25 g, ma con tanto sale il pane risulterà molto salato) (ho utilizzato 14 grammi di sale ma erano un po' pochini. Oserei consigliare 16-18 grammi) 
6-7 cucchiai di farina per panificazione che ho aggiunto alla terza piega, poiché l'impasto era troppo liquido 
- Altra farina per panificazione per la superficie di lavoro e la teglia 
- semola di mais per la pietra refrattaria

Impastare con l'impastatrice: 
L'indomani versare nella ciotola dell'impastatrice tutta la farina di semola di grano duro, 1 tazza di farina per panificazione e tutta la biga. 
Mescolare con la frusta a foglia per 17 minuti alla velocità minima (potrebbe essere necessario fare delle pause per non surriscaldare l'impastatrice).
Poi aggiungere il sale e mescolare per altri 3 minuti.
L'autrice del libro consiglia di aggiungere altra farina affinché l'impasto "comes together" (si compatta) Ma non sapendo cosa intendesse con "si compatta" e quanto "si dovesse compattare", ho aggiunto solamente il 1/4 di tazza che mi mancava. D'altronde avevo già aumentato la quantità di farina alla partenza. 


Impastare a mano (per i più coraggiosi !! ma io non lo consiglio)
Se siete tanto coraggiosi da fare l'impasto a mano, vi auguro buona fortuna. 
Versare in una grande ciotola tutta la farina di semola di grano duro, 1 tazza di farina per panificazione e tutta la biga.
Mescolare con una spatola di gomma o un cucchiaio di legno per 25-30 minuti poi aggiungere il sale e il resto della farina (se necessario) e continuare a mescolare per altri 5 minuti. L'impasto è molto idratato (umido) e non sarà possibile impastarlo. 

Prima lievitazione: 
Versare l'impasto in una grande ciotola e appoggiarla su un anello di wok o griglia affinché l'aria possa circolare tutt'intorno (foto 1). Coprire con un telo appoggiandolo ai bordi della ciotola e lasciare lievitare a circa 21°C.
Dopo ogni ora, rigirare l'impasto nella ciotola. Sarà pronto quando avrà triplicato di volume, in circa 4-5 ore. (Ho fatto 5 pieghe (una ad ogni ora) con la speranza che l'impasto diventasse più "forte". Alla terza piega ho deciso di aggiungere 6-7 cucchiai di farina per panificazione poiché più che un impasto per pane il mio era "pastella"). (foto 2: la pasta dopo il 5° turno)

Seconda Lievitazione e Forma: 
Preparare un mucchietto di farina che vi servirà per le mani e per l'impasto e infarinare per bene la superficie di lavoro. 
Versare l'impasto sulla superficie di lavoro ben infarinata e cospargelo con farina. 
Poi semplicemente piegando e ripiegando i bordi dell'impasto dare una forma arrotondata (foto 3). Non cercate di modellarlo con precisione poiché con un impasto tanto idratato sarebbe quasi impossibile. 
(Il mio impasto era così molliccio e appiccicoso che ho dovuto aggiungere farina e"girarlo in aria, ripiegarlo e farlo cadere sulla superficie di lavoro" per dargli un po' di forza. Non oso dire che a questo punto avevo ormai perso qualsiasi speranza!)
Spostare l'impasto su una teglia munita di carta da forno ben infarinata, coprire con un panno umido e lasciare lievitare fino a quando l'impasto non si riempia di bolle, circa 45 minuti*
30 minuti prima della cottura, inserire la pietra refrattaria nel forno e preriscaldare a 245°C (foto 4) (*dopo 45 minuti ho diviso l'impasto con un raschietto sebbene non fosse ancora pieno di bolle. Poi ho torso ogni pezzo (1 o 2 pieghe) e disposto le pagnotte su una superficie cosparsa di semola di mais (foto 5))

Cottura: 
Appena prima della cottura, dividere l'impasto a metà con un raschietto (il coltello strapperebbe l'impasto). 
Allontanare delicatamente le due metà e girarle, affiché il taglio sia in alto (li ho torsi delicatamente e NON in modo stretto).
Cospargere la pietra refrattaria con semola di mais (ahi ahi! sebbene la mia vocina interiore lanciava gridi d'allarme, l'ho fatto ugualmente. Il risultato: la semola è bruciata (carbonizzata) in pochissimo tempo! Con un mestolo di legno l'ho spostata ai lati e poichè il pane era stato appoggiato sulla semola e la sua base era ben "insemolata", non è rimasto appiccicato alla pietra refrattaria) e far scivolare le pagnotte sulla pietra (foto 6). Se non aveta a disposizione una pietra refrattria, cuocete il pane direttamente sulla teglia. 
Cuocere per circa 30-35 minuti (dopo 20 minuti ho ridotto il calore a 200°C) e far raffreddare su una griglia prima di affettare.





"Back to the Future, Buddies" Badge
Il badge di "Back to the Future, Buddies"
Back to the Future, Buddies


please copy the whole text and paste it in your blog
p.f. copiate tutto il testo e inseritelo nel vostro blog



 LINKS:
Link to the Rules (how to participate) - Link al regolamento (come partecipare)
- Link to our Facebook group Link al nostro gruppo su Facebook 
- Link to the Recipe Summary & to the Round up Summary  - Link al sommario delle ricette E alle raccolte mensili


I've shared this recipe with:
Sweet and That's it










Print Friendly and PDF

  Sign up to my free Newsletter. Iscriviti alla mia Newsletter gratuita.
To validate, please check your email (or spam folder) and press on the confirmation link. 
Per validare l'iscrizione, premi il link di conferma che riceverai per email (controllare la casella di posta indesiderata).


1 comment:

MANY THANKS for your Feedback - IL VOSTRO COMMENTO MI STA A CUORE!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...