Aug 28, 2014

Polenta Bread - Pane di Polenta

      English / Italiano

Polenta Bread...What shall I say? A win-win-win-win recipe: the dough did not stick to the bannetons, it did not stick to the cloche (borders or bottom), it had a wonderful ovenspring and was a big hit in the family. My children keep asking for more. (Not to mention that I easily made it when I was feeling sick and had a bad rhinosinuitis...)
Thank you so much Bread Baking Babe Elizabeth of "Blog from OUR kitchen" for choosing this recipe.
PS: You can make this bread with your sourdough or as a shortcut you can prepare the small and the starter as explained below.

Questa ricetta del Pane alla Polenta è una ricetta 4 volte vincente: 
1) Sapore strepitoso: un enorme successo in famiglia. I miei bimbi lo richiedono in continuazione 
2) l'impasto non è rimasto appiccicato al banneton
3) l'impasto non è rimasto appiccicato al piatto o ai bordi della cloche
4) la lievitazione nel forno è a dir poco splendida
4 volte grazie alla Bread Baking Babe Elizabeth di "Blog from OUR kitchen" per aver proposto questa squisita ricetta.
PS: Per preparate questo pane potete utilizzare la vostra pasta madre oppure "come scorciatoia" preparare la "piccola e grande biga", come spiegato qui sotto.


THE LITTLE BIGA AND THE STARTER


The afternoon before:
Tiny Biga (picture 1 & 2)

9 grams (9 ml) water at 95°F/35°C
0.25 grams (1/16 teaspoon) active dry yeast
11 grams (4 teaspoons) unbleached all-purpose flour

In the early afternoon of the day before you are baking the bread, whisk the yeast with the lukewarm water in a smallish bowl until it has dissolved. 
Using a wooden spoon and/or your hands, mix in the small amount of flour until it is smooth (picture 1). Cover the bowl with a plate and leave on the counter, out of drafts, to ferment (picture 2).

The evening before:
Starter (picture 3 & 4):

60 grams water at 95°F/35°C
0.25 grams active dry yeast
all of the Biga (or 20 grams fermented sourdough)
100 grams unbleached all-purpose flour

In the evening of the day before you are baking the bread, whisk the active dry yeast (0.25 g) with warm water in a medium-sized bowl until it has dissolved. Add the tiny biga that should be bubbling nicely and mix well. Add the flour and mix with a wooden spoon, then knead with your hands until you have a smooth lump of dough (picture 3)Cover the bowl with a plate and leave on the counter, out of drafts, to ferment. Picture 4 shows the starter the next day.

THE POLENTA


The Polenta:
The picture above shows the 5 min. polenta (fine) and the 45 min. polenta (coarse). For this recipe I've used the 45 minutes polenta and had to add much more liquid (about 260 ml of a mixture of 1/2 milk and 1/2 water) and cook it for at least 20-25 minutes, until it lost its crunchy-ness. Furthermore I've added a pinch of salt.

35 grams cornmeal aka polenta, coarsely ground
175 grams cold water
pinch of salt (not in the original recipe)

In the morning of the day you are baking the bread, pour cold water into a small pot on the stove at medium high heat. Add the polenta (and the salt) and using a wooden spoon, cook, stirring constantly until the mixture is thick – about 5 minutes. Apparently, if you have a microwave oven, you can put the water and polenta into a microwavable container and cook it at high for 4 minutes, stir it and continue to cook for 2 minutes more. 
Once the polenta is made, remove it from the pot to a plate or shallow container and put it into the fridge to cool (I've left it on the counter and added it to the dough when it was still lukewarm).

THE DOUGH


The Dough: 
390 grams water at 80°F/26°C
0.5 g (1/8 teaspoon) active dry yeast (I've used 2 grams!! and I had a wonderful ovenspring!)

265 grams unbleached all-purpose flour, 
I've used:       » 200 grams high gluten flour (12.8% protein)
                     » 60 grams whole wheat flour milled at home
                     » 40 g ground flaxseeds

335 grams unbleached bread flour (Germany Nr. 550)
all of the starter
18 grams salt
all of the cooked polenta


cornmeal, for garnish (I did not use it on top of my bread)

Mixing: In a large mixing bowl, whisk the active dry yeast with warm water until it has dissolved.
Add the starter (that should have doubled and be quite bubbly). 
Using a wooden spoon, stir in the flours, the ground flaxseeds and the salt. It might be pretty sloppy... or not... it might just be shaggy.
(at this time I was pretty sure I wasn't going to use my kneading machine...)*

Kneading:
By hand: Lay the cooled polenta on top of the dough. Plunge in with your hands to turn and fold the dough in the bowl, kneading until it’s smooth (5 to 10 minutes). When the dough is smooth, decide to continue your radical behaviour learned from wayward BBBabes and skip the washing and drying the mixing bowl step. Simply cover the bowl with a plate to rest.

By kneading machine: *...but then I changed my mind. I poured the dough and the polenta in its bowl (picture 1) and let it knead for 15-20 minutes (that long since I was using the plunging arm kneading machine). Then I transferred the dough into the big bowl I've used at the beginning and covered it.

After about 20 minutes, turn and fold the dough a few times. Notice that it is significantly smoother. Cover the bowl with a plate and set it aside in the oven with only the light turned on to rise until it has doubled (picture 2). Don’t worry if it is quite sloppy. If it rises earlier than you expect, simply deflate the dough and allow it to rise again. This will just strengthen the dough. 

Shaping:
When you are ready to shape the bread, turn it out onto a lightly floured board and divide it into 2 pieces. Trying not to disturb the bubbles too much, shape into two rounds. 
Liberally spray the tops of the shaped loaves with water. Cover them with cornmeal. (Glezer suggests rolling the sprayed shaped loaves in the cornmeal placed on a plate.) - I did not spray them, nor sprinkled them with cornmeal. 
Put each loaves seam-side up in a brotform/banneton, tightly woven basket or colander. 
Cover each one with a mixing bowl or plastic foil (picture 3) and allow them to rise on the counter** (or in the oven with only the light turned on) until almost double. Halfway through I've sprinkled the top with cornmeal (finely ground), in order to prevent the plastic foil from sticking to the dough (picture 4), then I covered it with plastic foil and waited for it to finish proofing (** the second banneton went into the fridge for 20 minutes, in order to slow down proofing. I took it out of the fridge when I removed the cloche from the first bread).



Preheat:
Put a baking stone on the middle shelf of the oven and preheat to 375°F/175°C.
I've preheated my 'Emile Henry Cloche "Le Pain"' (cloche and plate) at 446°F/230°C.

Baking:
On a baking stone: Turn each loaf out of its container onto a square of parchment paper. Using a very sharp knife (or a razor of lamé if you have one), starting at the center of the loaf and holding the blade almost horizontally, carve a spiral into each loaf. Try not to freak out if the spirals look like vicious circles. 
Liberally spray the tops of the loaves with water. Using a peel, slide them onto the hot stone and bake for about 40 minutes, turning them around once half way through baking, to account for uneven oven heat. The crust should be quite dark and the internal temperature should be somewhere between 200°F and 210°F (93°C/98°C). 
Allow the baked bread to cool completely before cutting into it as it’s still baking inside! 

In a preheated cloche: Remove only the plate of the cloche from the oven and close the oven.
Arrange the plate of the cloche on a wire rack and sprinkle with polenta (fine)  (picture 1). Carefully turn the loaf out of its container onto the plate (in the center!) (picture 2).
Using a very sharp knife (or a razor of lamé if you have one), starting at the center of the loaf and holding the blade almost horizontally, carve a spiral into each loaf (picture 3). Try not to freak out if the spirals look like vicious circles.
Insert the plate into the oven and close with the cloche.
Bake at 446°F/230°C for 20 minutes, then remove the cloche, reduce temperature to 390°F/200°C and bake for 20 more minutes.
The crust should be quite dark and the internal temperature should be somewhere between 200°F and 210°F (93°C/98°C). 
Allow the baked bread to cool completely before cutting into it as it’s still baking inside! (pict. 4)


Aren't they beautiful? While cooling down the crust was singing!
The taste of this polenta bread is absolutely delicious! And the cooked polenta did not crack under my teeth! A lovely bread! A winner!



Inspired by: Ricetta tratta e adattata da: 

Della Fattoria's Polenta Bread on p.118-119 
in Artisan Baking Across America: 
the Breads, the Bakers, the Best Recipes 
by Maggie Glezer


Il giorno prima:

Il Pomeriggio:
"Piccola" Biga (foto 1 e 2):

9 ml di acqua a 35°C
0,25 grammi (1/16) cucchiaino di lievito di birra disidratato
11 grammi di farina

Nel primo pomeriggio del giorno prima della cottura del pane, sciogliere il lievito nell'acqua tiepida in una piccola ciotola.
Aggiungere la farina e amalgamare bene il composto con un cucchiaio di legno e/o le mani (foto 1). Coprire la ciotolina con un piatto e lasciare fermentare a temperatura ambiente e lontano da correnti d'aria (foto 2).

La Sera:
"Grande" Biga (foto 3 e 4):

60 grammi di acqua a 35°C
0,25 grammi (1/16) cucchiaino di lievito di birra disidratato
tutta la piccola biga (o 20 grammi di pasta madre matura)
100 grammi di farina 

La sera del giorno prima della cottura del pane, sciogliere il lievito nell'acqua tiepida in una ciotola più grande. Aggiungere la piccola biga (ora dovrebbe essere ben spumeggiante) e mescolare bene. Aggiungere la farina e mescolare dapprima con un cucchiaio di legno, poi impastare con le mani fino ad ottenere un impasto omogeneo (foto 3). Coprire con un piatto e lasciar lievitare a temperatura ambiente e lontano da correnti d'aria. La foto 4 mostra la "grande" biga il giorno successivo.


LA "PICCOLA E LA GRANDE" BIGA


La Polenta:

Nella foto sottostante sono raffigurate la polenta "cotta in 5 minuti" (fine) e la polenta "cotta in 45 minuti" (grossa). Per questa ricetta ho utilizzato la polenta a grana grossa e quindi ho dovuto utilizzare molto più liquido di quello descritto nella ricetta originale (per un totale di circa 260 ml) e cuocerla per 20-25 minuti, il tempo necessario per renderla un pochino più "tenera". Inoltre ho aggiunto un pizzico di sale.

35 grammi di polenta 
175 grammi di acqua fredda
un pizzico di sale (non c'era nella ricetta originale)

La mattina del giorno della cottura del pane, versare l'acqua fredda in un pentolino. Aggiungere la polenta (e il sale) e con un cucchiaio di legno, cuocere a fuoco medio-alto mescolando continuamente finché il composto non si addensi - circa 5 minuti.
Una volta cotta, versare la polenta su un piatto e farla raffreddare nel frigo (l'ho lasciata sul balcone e aggiunta all'impasto quando era ancora tiepidina).


LA POLENTA


L'Impasto:
390 grammi di acqua a 26°C
0,5 g (1/8 di cucchiaino) di lievito di birra disidratato (ne ho utilizzati 2 grammi e ho avuto una stupenda lievitazione nel forno!)

265 grammi di farina 
Ho utilizzato:   »200 grammi di farina di frumento forte (12,8% di proteine​​)
                      »60 grammi farina di frumento integrale macinata in casa
                      »40 g di semi di lino macinati

335 grammi di farina per panificazione (Germania Nr. 550)
tutta la biga
18 grammi di sale
tutta la polenta cotta

polenta per guarnire (ho preferito non cospargere il pane con la polenta)

Preparazione: In una grande ciotola sciogliere il lievito di birra nell'acqua tiepida. Aggiungere la biga (sarà piena di bolle - foto 4 sopra) e mescolare bene finché non si sia sciolta. 
Aggiungere la farina, i semi di lino macinati e il sale e mescolare con un cucchiaio di legno (fino a questo momento ero sicura di continuare ad impastare a mano... ma poi ho cambiato idea) *

Impastare:
A mano: Stendere la polenta raffreddata sulla parte superiore dell'impasto e impastare bene con le mani finché l'impasto non risulti omogeneo (da 5 a 10 minuti). Una volta pronto, coprirere la ciotola con un piatto e lasciar riposare per 20 minuti. 

Con impastatrice: * ... ma poi ho cambiato idea. Ho versato l'impasto e la polenta nella ciotola dell'impastatrice (foto 1) e impastato a velocità media per 15-20 minuti (tempo necessario all'impastatrice Miss Baker Pro a bracci tuffanti). Poi ho trasferito l'impasto nella grande ciotola che avevo utilizzato per miscelare gli ingredienti, l'ho chiusa con il coperchio e lasciato riposare l'impasto per 20 minuti.  

Dopo circa 20 minuti, fare un paio di giri di pieghe (notare come l'impasto sia diventato più morbido!), poi coprire la ciotola con un piatto e lasciarlo lievitare nel forno spento ma con la luce accesa fino a quando non sia raddoppiato di volume (foto 2). Se dovesse lievitare troppo velocemente, sgonfiarlo e fare un altro giro di pieghe. Questo procedimento servirà a donare forza all'impasto. 

Forma:
Versare l'impasto su una superfice leggermente infarinata e dividerlo in 2 pezzi. Formare due pagnotte rotonde cercando di non sgonfiare troppo le bolle d'aria. 
Spruzzare generosamente la parte superiore con acqua e cospargere con polenta (ho preferito non spruzzarli con acqua né cospargerli con polenta).
Trasferire le pagnotte nei banneton (forme per pane), cuciture dell'impasto verso l'alto. 
Coprire i banneton con pellicola trasparente (foto 3) e lasciar lievitare fino a quasi al raddoppio ** sul bancone o nel forno spento con la luce accesa. Ad un certo punto mi sono resa conto che l'impasto avrebbe aderito alla pellicola, così l'ho cosparso con polenta (fine), coperto con pellicola trasparente (foto 4) e atteso che terminasse la lievitazione. Attenzione: non deve raddoppiare! (** il secondo banneton l'ho messo nel frigo per rallentare la lievitazione della seconda pagnotta. L'ho tolto dal frigo dopo 20 minuti, dopo aver tolto la cloche al pane nel forno).
L'IMPASTO

Preriscaldare il forno: 
Inserire la pietra refrattaria e preriscaldare il forno a 175°C.
Per questo pane ho utilizzato la cloche "Le Pain" di Emile Henry, preriscaldando il piatto e la cloche a 230°C.

Cottura:
Sulla pietra refrattaria: 
Manovra delicata: Rovesciare il banneton e "far cadere" l'impasto su un pezzo di carta da forno. Con un coltello molto affilato (o un rasoio) incidere una spirale partendo dal centro della pagnotta e spruzzare generosamente la parte superiore con acqua. Utilizzando una pala, fare scivolare le pagnotte sulla pietra refrattaria e cuocere per circa 40 minuti. La crosta deve diventare piuttosto scura e la temperatura interna del pane dovrebbe raggiungere i 93°C-98°C. 
Sfornare e posare su una griglia. Attendere che il pane sia completamente raffreddato prima di affettarlo poichè la cottura continua anche fuori dal forno. 

Nella cloche preriscaldata: 
Togliere dal forno solo il piatto, disporlo su una griglia e richiudere il forno. 
Cospargere il piatto con polenta (fine) (foto 1)
Manovra delicata: Rovesciare il banneton e "far cadere" l'impasto nel centro del piatto (foto 2), poi con un coltello molto affilato (o un rasoio) incidere una spirale partendo dal centro della pagnotta (foto 3).
Inserire il piatto nel forno e chiudere con la cloche. 
Cuocere per 20 minuti a 230°C, poi rimuovere la cloche, ridurre la temperatura a 200° C e cuocere per altri 20 minuti.
La crosta deve diventare piuttosto scura e la temperatura interna del pane dovrebbe raggiungere i 93°C-98°C. 
Sfornare e posare su una griglia  (foto 4). Attendere che il pane sia completamente raffreddato prima di affettarlo poichè  la cottura continua anche fuori dal forno. Sentirete come "canta bene" mentre raffredda!




Quel magico momento quando togli la cloche.... 
(prima della cottura e dopo 20 minuti)




Guardate che meraviglia queste pagnotte! Per non parlare della "sinfonia dello scrocchiettio" mentre raffreddavano: musica per le mie orecchie!
Il loro gusto è assolutamente delizioso: una ricetta vincente che rifarò presto!




Fancy becoming a Bread Baking Buddy? Here's how it works:
- You have until the 29th to bake the bread and post about it on your blog with a link to the Kitchen of the Month’s post about the bread.
- E-mail the Kitchen of the Month (you'll find her name in my post) with your name and a link to your post OR leave a comment on the Kitchen of the Month’s blog that you have baked the bread and a link back to your post.
- The Kitchen of the Month will post a round-up of the Bread Baking Buddies at the end of the week and send them a BBB badge for that month’s bread.
No blog, No problem – just e-mail the Kitchen of the Month with a photo and brief description of the bread you baked and you’ll be included in the round-up.

Short glossary:
BBBabes: this group's creators.
Kitchen of the Month: the BBBabe who has chosen the recipe of the month. On his/her blog you'll find the recipe written in details.
BBBuddies: who's baking along, has sent the link and picture to the Kitchen of the Month and has received the BBB badge.


Fancy becoming a "Back to the Future, Buddies"?
The idea of baking the BBBabes breads I had missed from the creation of the group in 2009 stroke my mind, as each and every bread they had proposed had turned out to be a huge hit.
And that’s how this project came to life: all the way from the beginning and back to the future, that’s what we are going to bake.
Join us, it’s going to be fun, it’s going to be delicious!

PS: If you wish, join the group on Facebook by clicking here.

Volete anche voi entrare a far parte del mondo dei "Bread Baking Buddies”? Ecco come funziona:  
- Capire l'inglese (poiché non ho ancora visto nessun altro tradurre le ricette in italiano).
- Avete tempo fino al 29 di ogni mese per preparare il pane e scrivere un articolo a riguardo sul vostro blog, includendo un link alla Kitchen of the Month (cucina del mese – colui/colei che ha scelto la ricetta. Il nome lo trovate nel mio articolo).
- Mandare una E-mail alla Kitchen of the Month con il vostro nome e il link al vostro articolo o lasciare un commento sul suo blog, dicendo che avete preparato il pane e il relativo link al vostro articolo.
- The Kitchen of the Month pubblicherà alla fine della settimana una raccolta di tutti i BBBuddies e invierà loro il magnifico Badge per il pane di quel mese.
- No blog, No problems! Inviate una e-mail alla Kitchen of the Month con una foto ed una breve descrizione del pane che avete preparato. Sarete così inclusi nella raccolta di BBBuddies.

Con tutte queste sigle, piccolo glossario:
BBBabes: i creatori / creatrici del gruppo
Kitchen of the Month: il / la BBBabe che ha scelto la ricetta del mese. Sul suo blog troverete la ricetta passo per passo.
BBBuddies: tutti coloro che hanno preparato il pane del mese, inviato foto e link alla Kitchen of the Month e ricevuto il distintivo (Badge).  



Volete anche voi entrare a far parte del mondo dei "Back to the Future, Buddies?”
Un paio di giorni fa sono stata colta dall’irrefrenabile voglia di preparare tutti i pani che mi ero persa dalla creazione del gruppo nel 2009… anche perché ogni loro ricetta si è rivelata un grande successo.
E così è nato questo progetto: ripercorrere tutta la strada dall’inizio e "Back to the Future", … ed è così che faccio appello a voi,  amanti delle cose buone fatte in casa: unitevi al gruppo: sarà divertente, sarà delizioso.
Se lo desiderate, unitevi al gruppo su Facebook, cliccando qui.

I've submitted this recipe to: 
Ho condiviso la ricetta con:
Sweet and That's it
Made with Love Mondays, hosted by Javelin Warrior





















Print Friendly and PDF

  Sign up to my free Newsletter. Iscriviti alla mia Newsletter gratuita.
To validate, please check your email (or spam folder) and press on the confirmation link. 
Per validare l'iscrizione, premi il link di conferma che riceverai per email (controllare la casella di posta indesiderata).


4 comments:

  1. Meraviglioso il tuo pane con polenta, deve essere delizioso!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your loaves are fabulous!!! How did you get that rise? And the crust is beautiful. And it is a great loaf!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many thanks Jamie. It was absolutely delicious.
      I actually do not know if the fact that I've added more yeast or if it was due to the Cloche that I had that fantastic ovenspring... Or maybe it was just luck ;-)

      Delete

MANY THANKS for your Feedback - IL VOSTRO COMMENTO MI STA A CUORE!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...